Creating Golden Syrup – lifting the lid on the golden elixir

Apr 18 2016

 

Golden Syrup with button

Golden Syrup made from sugar cane grown in the sun – a natural pure sweetener

Creating great and glorious golden elixirs.

Ragus ‘lifts the lid’ on how Golden Syrup is made.

Our new video presentation provides a valuable insight into the modern manufacturing and crafting of one of the worlds great food products – Golden Syrup.

The video was produced with professional film and sound studio teams throughout the UK and on location at the Ragus production facility with the invaluable contribution of the Ragus Golden Syrup production teams.

Ragus Marketing Director Ben Eastick with photographers, stylists, models and brand consultants on a studio set.

Ragus Marketing Director Ben Eastick with photographers, stylists, models and brand consultants on a studio set

The Ragus process of Golden Syrup manufacture is explained from raw material handling, expert formulation and preparation of delivery to customers. All carried out in our UK production facility, one of the world’s most advanced sugar manufacturing sites.

Ragus production facility Berkshire, England

Ragus production facility Berkshire, England

The video highlights our sourcing the globe from Africa to the Caribbean to South America and the Pacific as well as Europe to find the best, most reliable and sustainably produced, certified sources of pure sugar.

Checking raw sugar crystals quality at source in Guadeloupe, Caribbean.

Checking raw sugar crystals quality at source in Guadeloupe, Caribbean

Made from natural pure sugars it is the delicious sweet condiment loved by generations, the magic ingredient of home baking and the key, versatile ingredient of food industry production professionals for taste, texture and colour of bakery, confectionery and savoury products.

Golden Syrup is key to adding texture and colour during the baking of biscuits.

Golden Syrup is key to adding texture and colour during the baking of biscuits

Golden Syrup was first formulated in 1883 by our company founder and chemist, Charles Eastick. Since that time in Victorian England little has changed in the recipe for the glorious elixir. The Ragus company was established by Charles Eastick in 1928 and today with 87 years of sugar experience and knowledge the company is a major specialist manufacturer and supplier producing over 31,000 tonnes of different sugar formulations annually.

Our founders brand, Eastick's. The classic choice from our range of Golden Syrups.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Eastick_MBE

Our founders Golden Syrup brand Eastick’s has a sweetness value that’s 20% higher than table sugar and with its distinctive mellow flavour, natural yellow hue and inherent preservative qualities it’s the classic choice from the Ragus range of Golden Syrups.

Our founders brand, Eastick's. The classic choice from our range of Golden Syrups

Our founders brand, Eastick’s. The classic choice from our range of Golden Syrups

Ragus is very proud of our long association with Golden Syrup as one of the world’s great products and it’s value to professional bakers, chefs and confectioners in modern food production.

Golden Syrup is the sweet ingredient for creative food industry professionals

Golden Syrup is the sweet ingredient for creative food industry professionals

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Brewing & Distilling Sugars Report Highlights Ragus Expertise

Jan 18 2016

Steve Curtis, Editor of IBD Brewer and Distiller International magazine visited Ragus HQ and our new Production Facility in 2015. He was on a fact-finding mission in connection with an upcoming technical article to cover all aspects of the production of brewing sugars from raw materials to packaging.

His comprehensive report is now published and available here to download. Detailed and informative it focusses on pure sugar as an essential part of the brewing and distilling industries. It also provides an excellent insight to Ragus operations highlighting our many years experience and knowledge in the manufacture of specialist sugar products.

Ben Eastick, Ragus Marketing Director with Steve Curtis, Editor of IBD Brewer and Distiller International

Ben Eastick, Ragus Marketing Director with Steve Curtis, Editor of IBD Brewer and Distiller International.

The Ragus Production Facility tour began with a briefing on Ragus’ 87 year history and the range of brewing sugars supplied today.

IBD

 

 

 

The Institute of Brewing and Distilling

http://www.ibd.org.uk

 

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“Project Goldie” Video To Be Released Autumn 2015

Aug 25 2015

Manufacture of Golden Syrup Made From Pure Sugars Being Filmed at the Ragus UK Sugar Facility

Manufacture of Golden Syrup made from pure sugars being filmed at the Ragus UK sugar facility.

Filming took place at our U.K. sugar factory close to west London over the weekend, putting the final touches to our latest video about the origins and present day modern manufacture of the glorious elixir that is Golden Syrup.

Ragus Founders Golden Syrup Eastick's Being Filled Into 25kg Containers

Ragus founders Golden Syrup, Eastick’s being filled into 25kg containers.

The video will highlight our sourcing the globe from Africa to the Caribbean to South America and the Pacific as well as Europe to find the best, most reliable, and sustainably produced, certified sources of pure sugar. Also we’ll ‘lift the lid’ on our U.K. manufacturing facility, one of the world’s most advanced sugar manufacturing sites producing hundreds of tonnes of sugars and syrups each day and delivering our sugar products across the globe both to small artisan food producers and major multinationals across the baking, brewing, confectionery and pharmaceutical manufacturing industries.

Ragus Tanker Containing 25 Tonnes of Eastick's Golden Syrup on the Weigh Bridge at Ragus UK production Facility

Ragus tanker containing 25 tonnes of Eastick’s Golden Syrup on the weigh bridge at Ragus UK production facility.

The production of “Project Goldie” commenced in the spring of this year and will be ready for release to the public in Autumn 2015.

Charles Eastick MBE (1860-1947)

Read about Charles Eastick MBE on Wikipedia

Wikipedia

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Sugar Versus Alternative Sweeteners

Jul 24 2015

Natural & Artificial Sweeteners

Alternative sweeteners cannot perform or replicate all the many functions of natural sugar.

In 2014, sugar confectionery sales dropped for the very first time, with sweeteners and sugar replacements growing in prominence. However, the sugar-free confectionery market is still relatively small.

With ongoing concerns about the reduction of sugar in the diet, many observers believe that the sugar-free confectionery market should be booming. This primarily due to ongoing technical developments that have improved sensory properties, and the appearance of new sweeteners and other ingredients with a more natural image. However, sugar-free lines accounted for less than 7 percent of global confectionery launches recorded by Innova Insights in 2014, which is a similar penetration level to that in 2013. Sugar-free launches represented just 1 percent of chocolate confectionery introductions, rising to 7.5 percent in sugar confectionery and to over 63 percent in chewing gum.

Just over 1 percent of confectionery launches in 2014 featured stevia as an ingredient, which was similar level to that in food and drinks as a whole, but behind the levels of use in soft drinks and tabletop sweeteners, for example. “Formulation problems and the bitter after-taste of stevia are felt to have held back product activity in some instances,” notes Lu Ann Williams, director of innovation at Innova Market Insights. “However, some sectors have found this less of an issue, particularly liquorice sweets and medicated confectionery, and improved formulations are now being introduced to allow more products in other areas. The confectionery industry has been perhaps slower to take on stevia sweeteners than originally forecast, and it remains to be seen how take-up will develop over the next few years”, Williams adds.

Weighing in on the debate, Ben Eastick, director of Ragus Sugars – pure sugar and syrup specialists – makes the case for his company’s core product: “Sugar has been around since the dawn of time and remains the ‘gold standard’ sweetener by which all others are compared, whilst also a natural product”. He continues, “Unlike sweeteners (including natural fruit derived sweeteners), there are few chemicals used to process sugar-and the ones that are would not be deemed as harmful. These may include carbon or milk of lime, for example, and they do not remain in the finished product”.

Ben Eastick

Ben Eastick, Marketing Director of Ragus Sugars.

“No other sweetening alternative can perform or replicate all the functions that sugar can: namely sweetening, colour development, flavour, bulking, and moisture retention, which allows products to remain fresher and more stable for longer. Sugar also eats bacteria, stabilising products. Ragus actually makes a lot of sugar products that go into the dietary industry where sugar is used as a bulking component to replace fat”.

There has been a fair amount of negative press coverage on sugar in recent times, but Eastick believes that this is nothing new, as the same had also occurred in the 70s and 80s. He explains: “Despite criticism, there is a lot of misinformation about sugar in the press, particularly in relation to fructose. Fructose derived from wheat or maize easily converts to fat, and also suppresses the action of a hormone called lecithin. This hormone tells the brain when the fat cells have had enough carbohydrate, so it is better to have sugar as the lecithin is not suppressed with sucrose”. He adds: “If you take sugar out of food products and replace it with a sweetener like stevia, you need to add polyols for bulk, and the recipe ends up being less natural and more expensive. The future is about moderation in our intake, and educating people the true facts. Eventually, the consumer will wise up, just as they did with the butter versus margarine debate”.

A recent report states that sugar does not cause a ‘sugar rush’ in children after all, and Eastick concludes that a teaspoon of sugar contains only 16 calories-which is actually less than a carrot.

Kennedy's Confection
 
 
 
 
 
 
http://www.kennedysconfection.com

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Institute of Brewing & Distilling Visit Ragus HQ

Feb 11 2015

 

Ben Eastick & Steve Curtis With Portrait Of Charles Eastick

Ben Eastick and Steve Curtis with a portrait of Ragus founder Charles Eastick.

Ragus’ Marketing Director Ben Eastick welcomed Steve Curtis, Editor of the Institute’s International magazine to Ragus HQ.

Steve was on a fact-finding mission in connection with an upcoming technical article to cover all aspects of the production of brewing sugars from raw materials to packaging. It was also a good opportunity to be reminded of the history of Ragus, brewing sugars past, present and future as well as an inspection of our UK Production facility. Brewing with liquid and block sugars was of particular interest re: benefits and costs.

Steve commented “Since the IBDs last visit in 2001 I am very impressed by Ragus technical advancements in the production of brewing sugars & syrups in their new manufacturing facility. It is a huge re-assurance to the brewing industry that Ragus continues to provide quality brewing sugars of the highest purity”.

Ben Eastick & Steve Curtis With Golden Syrup

The tour began with a briefing on Ragus’ 86 year history and the range of brewing sugars supplied today.

Ben Eastick, Mel Boyle & Steve Curtis

Factory Manager Mel Boyle (centre) took charge of the factory tour.

Ben Eastick, Steve Curtis & Mel Boyle With Raw Materials In Goods Section

Raw materials from African, Caribbean, Pacific and European countries in the Goods In section.

Inspecting Inversion Pans

Inspecting inversion pans which are very similar to brewing ‘coppers’.

Production Samples Of Brewing Liquid & Block Products In The Laboratory

Production samples of brewing liquid and block products are recorded and filed in the laboratory.

IBD
 
 
 
 
 
The Institute of Brewing & Distilling

http://www.ibd.org.uk

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Bonsucro Sugar Visit Ragus UK Facility

Dec 12 2014

Ben Eastick, Manuela Czinar, Joe Woodruff and Richard Livermore

Manuela Czinar and Joe Woodruff of Bonsucro with Ragus’ Ben Eastick and Richard Livermore.

Bonsucro the global non-profit, multi-stakeholder organisation for sustainable sugarcane production visited the Ragus manufacturing facility to better understand the unique production capabilities of the UK based operation.

“It was fascinating to see one of our members with such technical expertise and a diverse range of products, all in the United Kingdom. Ragus are a great example of the diversity and strength of Bonsucro’s membership”.

– Joe Woodruff, Communications Specialist at Bonsucro

Following on from the successful End User and Intermediary conference in London in July, Ragus’ Ben Eastick and Richard Livermore outlined the importance of delivering the uptake of certified sugar in order to ensure the expansion of Bonsucro certified sugar. Globally, the land that is under sugarcane cultivation that is now Bonsucro certified stands at 3.74%.

Manuela Czinar & Joe Woodruff

Bonsucro’s Manuela Czinar and Joe Woodruff visiting the Ragus UK production facility.

Bonsucro

 
 
 
 
 

http://www.bonsucro.com

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