Laboratory Testing for Sugar Production

Jan 17 2019

Ragus has over 90 years of experience manufacturing pure sugars and syrups. In fact, as long ago as 1880 our founder Charles Eastick, and his brother John, excited by sugar’s recent rise into ubiquity to British life, began a sugar analysis and consulting practice in the centre of London. Today, our state-of-the-art factory in Berkshire, has the latest advanced instrumentation, allowing Ragus to manufacture both straightforward and customised sugar formulations with a guaranteed supply on time and in full.

Ragus’ highly specialised team manufactures crystalline and syrup pure sugars that enable our customers to create products with consistent colour development, texture softening, flavour enhancement, binding of component ingredients and stability, for precise control to a specific formulation.

Ragus’ consulting service enables custom formulations to be created from the range of sugar products we manufacture. Our commitment to quality means that our sugar chemists follow demanding test procedures during the formulation of customised sugars and syrups made from raw materials that have full traceability.

To ensure we meet our customers’ specifications, all our pure sugar products are manufactured to the highest standards, so bearing this in mind meet Production Chemist Slawek Glowacki, as he explains the importance of Ragus’ state-of-the-art equipped sugar production laboratory.

QU: What is your role as a production chemist in Ragus’ laboratory?

“My role is to check and test all of the different sugars, syrups, molasses and glucose that we handle on site and approve them based on the specifications that they need to adhere to.”

Ragus has a team of sugar consultants working from its lab in the UK. The team provides advice on foodproduction, quality controls and food hygiene to its suppliers. Ragus' close relationship with its suppliers ensures that its customers can be confident that the raw sugar it sources has been grown, harvested, and shipped to its factory to the highest standards of food management.
 
QU: What is the function of an on-site laboratory?

“Our on-site laboratory is needed at our multi-million-pound state-of-the-art facility to test every product that arrives on site, test and monitor the progress of the production of our manufactured products and final check all products that leave our factory”.

QU: What are the sugar samples tested for and what is the importance of each test?

“All of our sugar products must be tested in order to meet their required specifications; for example, the pH balance, to verify the acidity/alkalinity, the colour to provide visual verification through the solution, polarisation to ensure that the product has been inverted correctly to attain the right conversion levels of fructose/glucose and for neutralisation to stop the process of sugar inversion.

We also have to verify the total amount of solids against the product specification which we do so by the BRIX method: this is a relative density scale that indicates the percent of sucrose by weight in a solution measured in degrees Brix (°Bx).”

QU: Ragus’ laboratory is well equipped with sophisticated instruments, but what are the different machines called and what are they used for?

“Yes, the laboratory is very well equipped with the best instruments recommended for testing, producing and carrying out chemical analysis on our sugar products. Our equipment allows us to analyse our samples for pH balances, colour, quality and much more.

For example, we use a high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) machine which allows us to separate, identify and quantify each component in a mixture.

We have refractometers (used for the BRIX testing) which are used to determine the index of refraction of liquid samples, and to measure fluid concentrations, such as sugar content. Polarimeters are also used in the laboratory for determining the different sugars in our syrups.”
Ragus has a team of sugar consultants working from its lab in the UK. The team provides advice on foodproduction, quality controls and food hygiene to its suppliers. Ragus' close relationship with its suppliers ensures that its customers can be confident that the raw sugar it sources has been grown, harvested, and shipped to its factory to the highest standards of food management.
 
QU: What could be the ramifications if Ragus did not test every production batch produced?

“Ragus could not and would not put our brand name against any product that is not thoroughly tested; if a product does not conform to our specifications then we would not verify it or release it.”

QU: Why does Ragus keeps every sugar or syrup sample for 18 months?

“All final product samples of both sugar and syrup that are manufactured at our facility must be kept for 18 months because on most products we give this as the best before date. We also have to keep our samples in the event that we ever get a complaint that a product has a fault, this way we are able to carry out further analysis.”

QU: What are the ICUMSA methods and do we adhere by their testing procedures? (The International Commission for Uniform Methods of Sugar Analysis)

“ICUMSA is the global body which brings together the activities of the National Committees for Sugar Analysis in more than 30-member countries.

The ICUMSA sugar colour grading system offers an easy way of categorising sugars; the ICUMSA developed a colorimetric method of measurement allowing producers to quickly and simply categorise their products in accordance with world-wide guidelines.

As Ragus are specialists in high quality natural pure sugars we use the ICUMSA specifications for both moisture analysis and colour analysis in all of our crystalline and syrup products.”

QU: What is EBC analysis and why do breweries use EBC testing for their colour standards and not ICUMSA?

“EBC (European Brewing Convention) is a special scale used to indicate colour in malts and sugars; the colour of beer can range from very lights to dark brown or black. Brewing industries prefer to use the EBC when colour grading their products because it is a much quicker process of colour verification than the ICUMSA method.”

Thanks, Slawek for giving a detailed insight of Ragus’ sugar technology laboratory.

Ragus Facts:
We only deliver products and services of the highest quality and have gained a range of accreditations to demonstrate this fundamental commitment.

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EU Sugar Beet Production – What does the future hold?

Jan 09 2019

The EU is the world’s leading producer of sugar beet, with approximately 50% of the global production; almost 18 million tonnes of beet sugar are produced every year in the Union. The sugar beet industry plays a critical part in the European rural and agricultural economy, but recently sugar beet producers have been suffering from low market prices and a series of changes in the sector.

The International Sugar Organisation has recently forecast the EU will produce 17.9-million tons of sugar in the 2018/2019 season, down from 19.7-million in the previous season. The intergovernmental body has not yet released a forecast for 2019/2020.

In October 2017, the EU scrapped sugar beet production quotas allowing producers to grow as much beet as they wanted for the first time since 2006, which lead to an increase in output. However, this current global glut of sugar has pushed world sugar prices to their lowest in more than ten years, throwing the European sector into crisis.

Beet sugar being grown; Ragus supports all its farmers and producers with advice and support on how to optimiseefficiencies, and promote the cause of sustainable sugar production
 
Thus today, the sugar beet sector is far from healthy. As the International federation of European Beet Growers explains, “the end of sugar beet quotas, combined with a depressed world market, have generated prices that are at their lowest level since the establishment of the European Commission Price Reporting System almost twelve years ago.”

The European commission has further said it expected total sugar consumption in the EU will reduce by five percent by 2030. Contributing factors to the decline include the ban of certain pesticides, the fact that Europeans are reducing their direct sugar intake, the global surplus of sugar stocks and environmental and unpredictable weather conditions.

Sugar lobbyist Ribera said it is “very difficult to predict” what will happen in coming years, but as the outlook for the European sugar sector is not particularly pleasing at the moment, measures need to be taken by farmers, processors and other major stakeholders to ensure the EU sugar beet industry can continue competing in the global market.

Beet sugar being grown; Ragus supports all its farmers and producers with advice and support on how to optimiseefficiencies, and promote the cause of sustainable sugar production
 
The European Parliament needs to take many factors into consideration to maintain sustainable beet growing amongst the EU Member States. These could include offering realistic subsidiaries to sugar beet farmers to ensure income stability, unfair trading practices need to be banned, financial support and time for researching new ways to protect crops, in light of the ban on certain pesticides, and to limit the amount of subsidised sugar other countries are dumping on the world market.

All this said though there will always be a demand for sugar beet as man’s demand for sweet foods is universal, and whatever people’s views are about sugar, it is still a vital ingredient in the food and drink industries. Sugar is not just a sweetener, it adds bulk, texture, and preserving qualities to many food products, such as jams, cakes, confectionery, and biscuits, which is impossible using artificial sweeteners.

Ragus Facts:
Ragus’ scour the globe for the best and most sustainable sources of beet and pure cane sugar for the manufacturing a wide range of sugars products. Our raw materials are soured from certified suppliers. Our Cane sugar comes from African, Caribbean and Pacific countries and our Beet sugar from within the European Union.

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How Caramel is Made – Caramel as a Sweet Confectionery [Part 2 of 2]

Jan 03 2019

Most people’s preconception of caramel is the little sweet, brown, slightly chewy, soft cubes of deliciousness that melt in your mouth when eaten, however caramel can also be used in chocolate or candy bars or as a topping for popcorn!

Caramel dates back to the 7th century and is one of the oldest confectioneries; sugar cane was discovered by the Arabs in Persia and on heating the cane they obtained a dark brown liquid which they called ‘Kurat Al Milh’ (ball of sugar) and the name ‘caramel’ derived from this!

Chefs, entrepreneurs and food manufacturers are coming up with new ways to incorporate caramel in their recipes because of its unique characteristics; from its appetising appearance and its tantalising aroma to its delicious smooth and sensual flavour, caramel and salted caramel flavours have become one of the most recent food trends.

Caramel as a Confectionery
To create a caramel as a type of confectionery, the amount of butter, type of milk and type of sugar can create differences in flavour, while varying cooking temperatures can affect the firmness; thus, creating caramels with various tastes, textures and appearances.

To create a variety of textures, caramel manufacturers use two different terms to categorise the product; ‘short’ is used for caramels that are soft and moist, and ‘long’, for a caramel that is chewy with a firmer consistency.

Unlike other candies, caramel is cooked at a lower temperature and as they contain more moisture they are softer; thus because of its texture caramel can be moulded and added to other ingredients (i.e. chocolate bars), or it can act as a binding agent or to add flavour and texture to products.

Pure sugar produced by Ragus. Ragus is one of the world's leading pure sugarmanufacturers. It sources raw sugar from across the world to manufacture sugars, syrups and special formulations from its advanced UK factory. Ragus ships its sugars globally, delivering on-time and in-full to customers across the brewing, baking, confectionary, and pharmaceutical industries

How is Caramel for Confectionery Made?
The ingredients for making caramel is sugar, invert/glucose syrup, milk (or cream) and butter, all of which are added together and cooked at 245°F. The brown colour is a result of the reaction between the protein in the cream/milk and the sugar; this process is called the Maillard reaction, which is named after the French scientist who discovered it.

The Maillard reaction occurs when part of the sugar molecule reacts with the nitrogen part of the protein molecule; this leads to the brown colour and the flavour compounds. If the mixture is cooked even further up to 338° F, it essentially become toffee, also known as caramelisation.

Pure sugar produced by Ragus. Ragus is one of the world's leading pure sugarmanufacturers. It sources raw sugar from across the world to manufacture sugars, syrups and special formulations from its advanced UK factory. Ragus ships its sugars globally, delivering on-time and in-full to customers across the brewing, baking, confectionary, and pharmaceutical industries
 
Ragus’s Key Ingredients for Caramel Confectionery
Ragus supplies invert/glucose syrups and brown sugars as ingredients to food and drink industries that can be used in the production of caramel as a confectionery.

Ragus’ Soft Brown Light Sugar or Dark Soft Brown Sugar is the perfect product for making your caramel and toffee creations, not only do they add colour, their finer grain size rapidly dissolves for sauce and toffee preparations and the molasses content adds flavour.

Ragus’ Invert sugars are used not only as a humectant to retain and preserve the moisture and as a flavour attractant, but they also have a high sweetness value.

To see our extensive range of pure sugars and syrups and to order your ingredients, check out our new online tool, our Product Finder, where you can filter through 50 different products: http://ragus.co.uk/product-finder/

If you fancy making your own salted caramel, then Ragus has the perfect recipe using our very own golden syrup and Soft Brown Light Sugar.

RAGUS’ SALTED CARAMEL

YOU WILL NEED
30g Unsalted Butter

100g Ragus Soft Brown Light Sugar

50g Ragus Golden Syrup

150ml Double Cream

Pinch of Sea Salt

METHOD
1. Melt butter, Ragus Soft Brown Light Sugar and Ragus Golden Syrup in a small heavy based pan. Heat gently, stirring until the sugar has dissolved and the butter has melted.

2. Add cream and a pinch of sea salt and simmer for 2 mins until thickened and smooth. Cool slightly, taste the sauce, add any extra salt.

Serve warm with ice cream and enjoy!

Pure sugar produced by Ragus. Ragus is one of the world's leading pure sugarmanufacturers. It sources raw sugar from across the world to manufacture sugars, syrups and special formulations from its advanced UK factory. Ragus ships its sugars globally, delivering on-time and in-full to customers across the brewing, baking, confectionary, and pharmaceutical industries

Ragus Fun Facts:

We’re specialists in high quality natural pure sugars and pure syrups, from raw cane sugar to specialist glucose-sugar blends.

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New Year’s Day – Lucky Foods to Eat made with Ragus’ pure sugars!

Dec 20 2018

New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day mark the beginning of 2019 and people all around the world believe in certain superstitions that will bring them health, wealth, long-life and happiness for the year to come.

Many of these superstitions involved eating certain foods to bring good luck; even the least superstitious amongst us can indulge in some of these symbolically lucky foods, after all there is no harm in trying to make 2019 a successful year! Plus, the good news is that many of these lucky foods use pure sugars and syrups as ingredients, products that we supply here at Ragus!

Travelling around the world you will come across many different New Year’s customs, for instance in Spain, Mexico and Portugal, eating 12 grapes at midnight, one for every strike of the clock, on New Year’s Eve is said to bring you good luck for the 12 months ahead. Pork dishes are also eaten in many cultures to bring good fortune for the new year; pigs root around with their snouts moving in a forward motion, so people eat pork to symbolise progress for the coming months.

There’s the Greek tradition of hiding a coin in a lemon-flavored cake called a vasilopita to bring you good fortune or then there are the Italians who eat honey-drenched donuts.

However, the superstition that excites Ragus the most, is ring-shaped cakes and other rounded sweet treats and bakery items. The ring-shape is meant to symbolise a full circle of luck to the eater. So, whether you’re going to eat a bagel or ringed donut for breakfast on New Year’s Day morning or bake your own Bundt cake you could be on your way to bringing luck to your year ahead; a Bundt cake is baked in a Bundt pan, shaping it into a distinctive ring shape.

As Ragus specialises in manufacturing pure sugars and syrups for food, drink and pharmaceutical industries here’s our Brown Sugar Bundt Cake Recipe made with our own Dark Soft Brown Sugar which provides a strong flavour and colour to cakes, toffee and savoury sauces; it is also high molasses content which adds moisture to cakes.

Our Brown Sugar Bundt Cake is perfect for the long chilly winter mother, coupled with a steaming mug of tea it is bound to brighten your spirits this New Year!

BROWN SUGAR BUNDT CAKE:
Ingredients
3 cups Plain Flour
½ Teaspoon Baking Soda
½ Teaspoon Salt
2½ Ragus’ Dark Soft Brown Sugar
½ Granulated Sugar
1½ Soft Butter
5 Medium Sized Eggs
2 Teaspoons Vanilla Extract
4 ounces Sour Cream

Method
Preheat oven to 325º F.
Grease with butter the Bundt tin and lightly dust with flour. Do not leave excess flour in the tin.
Mix together the butter and sugars until the texture is fluffy and light.
Add in the sour cream and one by one, the eggs, folding continuously.
Add flour, salt, and vanilla, followed by the baking soda.
Pour into prepared Bundt tin and bake for 1.5 hours or until cake tester comes out clean.
Remove from oven and rest for 15 minutes before turning the cake out onto a wire rack. Allow time to cool.

 
Add a DECLICIOUS extra!
Why not accompany your Brown Sugar Bundt Cake with our delicious salted caramel sauce made by using two of Ragus’ ingredients?

Firstly, Ragus’ Soft Brown Light Sugar which adds flavour and colour to cakes, toffee and sauces. It’s finer grain size rapidly dissolved for sauce and toffee preparations and its molasses content adds flavour.

And secondly, Ragus’ Golden Syrup with its distinctive mellow flavour. Our Golden Syrup performs the same task as invert syrups but with added flavour and subtle golden colour. Used in baking, biscuits, cakes, flapjacks and puddings, it has no added flavours or colours; this is the traditional golden syrup made from natural sugar ingredients. http://ragus.co.uk/recipes/salted-caramel-2/

Ragus’ Pure Syrups range fromfamiliar ingredients like Golden Syrup, to highly specialised products for industrial use, all manufactured at its advanced manufacturing site in the UK
 
Ragus Fun Facts:
We’re specialists in high quality natural pure sugars and pure syrups, from raw cane sugar to specialist glucose-sugar blends. With our new, simple product tool, you can filter through over 50 different sugars to find the right product for your industry. Find your ideal sugar or syrup here: http://ragus.co.uk/products/

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How Caramel is Made – Caramel as Syrups and Powders [Part 1 of 2]

Dec 13 2018

Caramel is an ingredient that it used in virtually every part of the food and drink industry; its purpose is to enhance taste and add colour to products. From bakery products to beers, to soups, sauces and even pet food, caramel in both syrup or powder form are used to create colour and flavour in order to make food and beverages look as good as they taste. Caramel syrups are also used in the pharmaceutical production of cough syrups and elixirs, while caramel in its powder form can also be used to add a deeper, richer colour in dry mixes for breads, cakes, toppings and dry pet food.

In this article we will discuss the caramelisation of sugar to produce a very deep, rich, dark brown coloured syrup, also known as burnt sugar. This type of caramel syrup is supplied by Ragus and is used to add flavour and colour to many dishes and beverages.

Ragus’ caramel syrup products are only made with either sugar that is burnt: a natural caramel known as E150a. Or with sugar and glucose syrup burnt with ammonia; not natural E150c. (An E number means that a food additive has passed safety tests and is approved for use here and in the rest of the EU.)

Burnt sugars are dark brown liquids or solids obtained by the controlled heat treatment of food sugars without any other chemical substances added. Burnt sugar gives a unique taste to food and beverages, but it is not a simple product to make; it takes practice and expertise to create.
Ragus’ Pure Syrups range fromfamiliar ingredients like Golden Syrup, to highly specialised products for industrial use, all manufactured at its advanced manufacturing site in the UK
 
Similar to making caramel, burnt sugar is the caramelization of sugar to produce a very deep, rich, brown-coloured syrup; despite being called ‘burnt’, you have to be careful not to overcook it as it would result in turning the mixture into a bitter, black product which cannot be used. The technique for cooking it, is to add sugar to water which is then heated to a temperature of 150 – 180 °C and stirred continuously until it turns a very dark brown.

What caramel syrup products does Ragus supply?
Ragus’ Caramelised Syrup E150a is dark brown/red in appearance and has a very rich taste but is made by the controlled burning of liquid sugar and glucose without any chemicals to create an aromatic flavour and dark amber colour.

Used to colour beverages such as brandies, bread, cakes, confectionery, preserved vegetables, fish and shellfish spreads, condiments, soft drinks, vinegar, alcoholic drinks, cheeses, breakfast cereals and processed meats. E150a is a permitted food colour worldwide.
Ragus’ Pure Syrups range from familiar ingredients like Golden Syrup, to highly specialised products for industrial use, all manufactured at its advanced manufacturing site in the UK
 
Ragus’ Caramel E150c has a black appearance with a very strong taste and is made by the controlled burning of liquid sugar with ammonia to create a very bitter flavour and dark colour.

It is used to colour beers, malt vinegar and sauces, soy sauce, confectionery, cheese, carbonated drinks, cereals, preserved vegetables, jams, jellies, marmalades and processed meats. E150c is a permitted food colour worldwide.

What Products can Ragus’ Caramel Syrups be Applied to?
• For brewing beer, craft beer or industrial beers our caramel syrups give different types of beer their colouring and they can reduce the bitterness and promote fermentation.
• They are used to give the caramel taste in ice cream and also to give the brown colouring found in caramel, coffee, rum & raisin flavours.
• Caramel syrups are used in alcohol as it enhances the brown tints of spirits and burnt sugars can also add flavour and distinction.
• In energy drinks our products add colour which creates the standard golden shades. Likewise, in carbonated soft drinks liquid caramel is used to provide colour while maintaining the brightness and clarity when fruit extracts or tannins are also present which have high acidic concentrations.
• Caramels are widely used in the baking industries in order to provide darker richer colours in products such a brown bread, puddings and cakes.

To see our extensive range of pure sugars and syrups and to order your ingredients, check out our new online tool, our Product Finder, where you can filter through 50 different products: http://ragus.co.uk/product-finder/

Ragus Fun Facts:
Our pure syrups range from familiar ingredients like golden syrup, to highly specialised products for industrial use.

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How to use Ragus’ pure sugars for Scandinavian Christmas recipes

Dec 06 2018

Christmas is the time of year for traditions and everyone has their favourites, from the way they decorate their Christmas tree, to the amount of alcohol they put in their Christmas cakes; every family is different, and the meaning of Christmas is passed down through the generations.

Many of the Western Christmas traditions that we know, and love can be traced back to Scandinavian beliefs and customs; Norway, Denmark, Sweden and Finland all celebrate the festive season in a huge way, after all, it is the land of snow, ice, reindeers and Santa! Food and drink play an important role in the typical Scandinavian festive period, so do you fancy giving your Christmas meals a little twist this year by adopting some ideas from our Scandinavian cousins?

The good news is that a majority of their festive delights use products that Ragus supply; our products span pure sugars and syrups to special formulations created by our expert team on site at our laboratory in the UK. We are specialists in high quality natural pure sugars and pure syrups, from raw cane sugar to specialist glucose-sugar blends and with our new, simple product tool, you can filter through over 50 different sugars to find the right product for your food and drink needs: http://ragus.co.uk/product-finder/

Packed with an abundance of wintry flavours like cardamom and cinnamon, ginger and mustard, Scandinavian food is guaranteed to warm and comfort you during the long, cold winter days and nights.

From spiced ham (Julskinka) using mustard and dark brown sugar, to sweet fruit bread using golden syrup, from cinnamon biscuits and gingerbread houses (Pepparkakshus) to spiced Christmas cake using muscovado and dark brown sugar; there is something for everyone to enjoy this festive season.

Pure sugar produced by Ragus. Ragus is one of the world's leading pure sugarmanufacturers. It sources raw sugar from across the world to manufacture sugars, syrups and special formulations from its advanced UK factory. Ragus ships its sugars globally, delivering on-time and in-full to customers across the brewing, baking, confectionary, and pharmaceutical industries
 
Many of the Scandinavian recipes will work delightfully on the Christmas table or as part of your festive celebrations and Ragus has all the products you need to create these fantastic recipes.

Ragus’ Soft Brown Light Sugar is ideal to use in cakes, toffee, sauces and in biscuits; it also adds volume to cakes and flavour and colour to your recipes.

Our Dark Soft Brown Sugar provides a strong flavour and colour to ginger cakes, gingerbreads, fruit cakes and toffee-based recipes and its high molasses content adds moisture to your creations.

If it’s the spiced Christmas cake that takes your festive fancy, then it is Ragus’ Dark Cane Muscovado Sugar you will need; rich in flavour and dark in colour it is ideal for your Christmas cakes.

And last but certainly not least is the Scandinavian spiced sweet bread which contains golden syrup and is great paired with a cheese platter. Did you know the founders of Ragus invented golden syrup; take a look at how this amber-coloured form of inverted sugar syrup is made. Our golden syrup is used in a variety of recipes, it has a distinctive mellow flavour and is made from natural sugar ingredients. Click here to find out how we make golden syrup at Ragus: https://bit.ly/2zlGkz8

Scandinavian Spiced Sweet Bread Recipe:

Preparation time: 1hr 30 mins – Cooking time: 40 mins (or until browned)

Ingredients:

500 ml Whole Milk
14g Dried Yeast
3 tbsp Ragus’ Golden Syrup
Grated zest of 2 unwaxed oranges
40g Raisins/Currents/Mixed Fruits
1 tsp Ground Cardamom
1 tsp Fine Sea Salt
200g Strong Brown Bread Flour
500g Strong White Bread Flour
1 egg, lightly beaten
Chopped mixed nuts for decoration

Pure sugar produced by Ragus. Ragus is one of the world's leading pure sugarmanufacturers. It sources raw sugar from across the world to manufacture sugars, syrups and special formulations from its advanced UK factory. Ragus ships its sugars globally, delivering on-time and in-full to customers across the brewing, baking, confectionary, and pharmaceutical industries
 
Method:

Preheat the oven to 200°C/gas mark 6.
Heat the milk until it is lukewarm, then whisk in the yeast and Ragus’ golden syrup. Remove from heat and rest for 5 minutes.
Pour liquid into a mixing bowl and add the orange zest, ground cardamom and sea salt.
Gradually add in the flour until you have a firm dough.
Cover with a clean towel and allow to rise for at least 30 minutes.
Once risen, knead the raisins/mixed fruit into the dough.
Divide the dough into two and shape accordingly to your chosen style.
Place each loaf on a previously prepared baking sheet, cover and stand in a warm room to allow to rise for an additional 30 minutes.
Brush the loaves with the beaten egg and sprinkle with chopped mixed nuts.
Bake for 30-40 minutes or until the bread looks browned.
Remove from oven and cool before eating.

Pure sugar produced by Ragus. Ragus is one of the world's leading pure sugar manufacturers. It sources raw sugar from across the world to manufacture sugars, syrups and special formulations from its advanced UK factory. Ragus ships its sugars globally, delivering on-time and in-full to customers across the brewing, baking, confectionary, and pharmaceutical industries
 

Now join Ragus and pour yourself a glass of bubbly as we raise a toast to a very Merry Christmas to all our customers, employees, family and friends.

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